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4 young teenagers making off with an NSRI Pink Rescue Floatation Buoy at Jeffreys Bay.
4 young teenagers making off with an NSRI Pink Rescue Floatation Buoy at Jeffreys Bay.
Deon of Seaport Supply, Paarden Eiland, with the NSRI Pink Rescue Floatation Buoy he recovered from a man walking into Paarden Eiland carrying the buoy.
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Pink rescue buoy stolen

NSRI are appealing to 4 young teenagers, 3 males and a female, who have been captured on CCTV cameras, making off with an NSRI Pink Rescue Buoy that is now missing from its post at Point Beach, Wavecrest, Jeffreys Bay.

The incident took place at 21h45, Wednesday, 12th December.

The 4 young teenagers can be seen walking out the car park and turning right into Plane Street. They then stop at the corners of Plane Street and Pagoda Crescent before continuing on their way, one of the teenagers, a male, can be seen clutching onto the NSRI Pink Buoy in one hand.

Anyone who recognises these teenagers from the photo attached can contact NSRI Communications at 0823803800.

The NSRI also expressed their grattitude to Deon Coetzer, of Seaport Supply, Paarden Eiland, who assisted in the recovery of a Pink Rescue Buoys stolen in Cape Town.

Deon noticed a man carrying a Pink Rescue Buoy into Paarden Island, Cape Town, on Thursday, 13 December 2018. Deon stopped the man and asked him to hand it over as it was clearly one of the NSRI’s Pink rescue buoys and should be returned to its position so that it could be used in a rescue.

"With community backing like this the Pink Rescue Buoy campaign, which has already helped to save 16 lives, will go from strength to strength,” said NSRI’s Drowning Prevention manager Andrew Ingram.

NSRI Pink Rescue Buoys were recently awarded at the IMRF (International Maritime Rescue Federation) conference, held in Norway, for Innovation and Technology.

Immense research went into their deployment around the South African coastline and the pink colour, because the luminous pink colour showed up as the brightest colour in surf conditions, is unique to NSRI.

To date 16 lives have been saved thanks to their deployment around the coastline and at some inland waterways.

NSRI have appealed to public participation to promote the success of these life saving floatation devices.

Pink Rescue Floatation Buoy's are stationed on poles at beaches with instructions on how they should be used.

UPDATE: Rescue buoy recovered:

The National Sea Rescue Institute said in a statement that the pink rescue bouy, which was removed from Point Beach in Jeffreys Bay on Wednesday night has been returned.

Four teenagers were caught on CCTV surveillance cameras while they removed the buoy.

The pink rescue buoys was returned to NSRI Station 37, and will be put back in place. The NSRI also received a formal apology.


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